Saturday, October 15, 2011

Kenmore 90 Series, Model 110 Clothes Dryer Runs But Has Stopped Heating and drying clothes - Quick How To repair

 

Kenmore 90 Series Clothes Dryer Heating safety sensors test and replacement procedures for Models 110.66901692 and Models 110.66902692

Have you recently discovered that your Kenmore 90 series, Model 110 clothes dryer or either your Heavy Duty, Super Capacity Plus Kenmore clothes dryer has not been drying your clothes?  Perhaps your clothes dryer will run but the dryer will not dry your clothes.

If your clothes dryer has stopped heating and drying your clothes then the info below will definitely help you.

The following is a picture tutorial / technical manual, to aid you the homeowner in being able to repair your clothes dryer that will not heat up.

If your Kenmore Clothes Dryers has stopped running mid-cycle or either runs but has stopped heating it is more than likely a faulty safety sensor.  Safety sensors are designed and installed during manufacture of the clothes dryers to prevent potential house fires from a clothes dryer that would potentially overheat.  They are great when they are working properly but when your dryer will no longer dry your clothes after an hour cycle of running it leaves you the homeowner wondering.

These safety sensors are a normally-closed electrical switch which under normal conditions keep the circuit closed at all times to allow the free flow of electrical current thereby allowing the heating element to heat up.  The interior contacts inside this switch would normally only open (disengage contact) only if the dryer's heating element were to reach some 'factory set' heat range that is considered too high.  At this point the switch opens and disrupts the electrical circuit and the dryer's heating element stops heating immediately.

As it is with most mechanical applications after some time these safety sensor switches become faulty and thus would create the situation of your clothes dryer running but not heating.  The electrical path's flow serving your heating element has been disrupted but not the motor's electrical needs, thus the reason your dryer is running but not heating.

First before you get too involved is to ensure that you have located the correct breaker in your electrical panel for your clothes dryer and turn it OFF.   The breaker should have been identified by the electrician on the inside of the panel's cover.  A typical clothes dryer breaker should be a double pole, 30 amp breaker.  Just look for 30 on the breaker's handle.

Just be sure you have turned off the correct one, you could unplug your dryer if you are not sure or if your breakers are not identified on the schematic on the inside cover of your electrical panel's cover.

After i wired my home i placed appropriate stickers on the panel's breakers to aid my wife and myself in  locating the correct ones later on, great suggestion. So turn off that 30 amp dryer breaker.

Tools needed:  Stiff putty knife
                       1/4" nut driver
                       Electrical Volt meter
Next remove your dryer's lower cabinet cover located directly underneath your dryer's door to gain entry to your dryer's mechanical components.
How to remove my clothes dryer's compartment panel- (located underneath dryer door)

The heating element and the safety sensors that need to be tested are on the side of this housing where the arrow is pointed.
 
 
 Disconnect the little white hose from the lint filtration housing to gain entry to the heating element housing.  Disconnect the hose from the upper connection as shown in photos above and simply bend it easily out of the way, stowing it out your way until the replacement of the sensors is wrought.  I did not take the entire white plastic hose off, i  just disconnected it from the junction as seen in the photo and then bent it easily behind the housing to the left. 

 Remove the front cover from the heating element housing.
 Remove these two screws from the element housing's base.
Make sure you have your dryer's electrical breaker off or either the dryer unplugged before reaching in to take these electrical leads off of the housing.  There are two hot wires serving this heating element that come from the wiring harness (collection of wires) from the central portion of the dryer.  One of these wires is attached to the front terminal block of the heating element (white block in pic below).  The second wire is attached to the rearmost sensor (thermal overload sensor).  If you look really close, all of the other wires are simply jumper wires (jumping from one sensor to the next), thus there are only two wires serving this element.  Each of these two wires feeding the element has 120 volts and when applied to the coil, create 240 volts of electricity at the coil.

Note:  These wires have a slight bend in them which depicts their frontal or rear locations which will aid you when reconnecting them after reinstalling the element housing.
 After the wires are disconnected grasp the element housing and twist gently to remove.

 pull straight out
Portion of dryer shown where the rear of the element housing will seat when reinstalling it.
Revealing the location of the leads on the sensors. You cannot accidentally mix the wires up on the sensors because the sensors are just a set of contacts and the electricity will flow through them either way the wires are connected.  When reconnecting wires after reinstalling heating element, see picture below for explanation and proper attachment.


 Notice the heating element's terminals here (picture above), we want to test the continuity and resistance through the element's coils to factor out whether or not this heating element is the origin of the issue with the dryer not heating and no longer drying clothes.  With your volt meter set to the Ohms, you should get a reading somewhere between 7 -12 ohms.
 This is the Ohm setting on an electrical meter.
With the volt meter set to the Ohms setting, touch one of your test leads to one terminal of the heating element and the other test lead to the other terminal.  Doesn't matter which test lead goes to which terminal. We are testing continuity and resistance, not electrical voltage so the arrangements of the leads does not matter.  We are simply trying to determine that the wired coils are still intact and that electrical energy can flow from one point (terminal) to the other point (terminal) via the wire.  The electrical reading is done by the volt meter sending a very small minute voltage through the wire via the volt meter's battery.
My measured 10.2 ohms so i am within the range.  So my heating element is not the origin of the problem.  If you do not receive any resistance measurement or continuity through the coil, you may have a bad heating element.  (replacement of heating element post)

 Next remove the thermostat from the side of the element's housing.  Check for an Ohm reading across both of the terminal contacts, once again it does not matter which lead you touch to which terminal.  I received a very low .1 percent of an Ohm, meaning their is almost perfect continuity across the interior contacts.  So this is not my problem either.  If you do not receive an ohm reading it means that your thermostat is faulty.



The contacts in this thermostat open when the temperature inside the element housing reaches around 250 degrees.  During normal operation this thermostat will open and close dependent upon that temp.  However, this thermostat will always be closed at room temperature, so you should receive an ohm reading, if nothing then your thermostat is faulty.  Apparently the interior contacts are 'burnt open', so this would be your culprit.

Next, check the heat limit cutoff fuse by removing it and checking it for continuity through the contacts.

This is a normally closed switch meaning that the contacts are always closed unless it senses too much heat inside the dryer.  So you should receive an ohm reading of some value, If you receive no ohm reading than the contacts are burnt out and are no longer 'closed' and thus are no longer touching therefore the switch is faulty.  These limit fuses are rated to open at approximately 390 degrees.  They are a 'one time' fuse, if you receive no ohm reading then you must replace.
see i received no reading, no numerical value registered, thus i knew this was the culprit of my dryer not heating anymore.
The Culprit.


You can easily test to confirm that the faulty switch in hand is indeed the origin of the issue by reinstalling the dryer element back into its original place. 
  1. Install heating element housing and put screws into their proper place.  
  2. Place the hot wire feed on the element terminal 
  3. place the lead that you removed off of the rear cutoff switch to the other terminal on the element
  4. You are bypassing the safety sensors just for a moment to verify that the dryer will heat up when these sensors are bypassed
  5. do you recall that i mentioned that the heating element terminals were different sizes so that one could not purposely bypass the sensors by installing the wires in this manner?   Also remember that my thermostat switch is in good condition so I can use this in the test.
  6. I just connected the return hot to the thermostat, then took the thermostat's short lead to my element terminal.  ah-ha, it fit, now i am just feeding through the element and the thermostat, bypassing the faulty cutoff sensor in the rear
  7. Yep, the element heated up..confirming that the sensor in hand is the culprit
 I ordered two more parts from appliancezone.com. I replaced the thermostat for any future just in case and while i was inside the dryer and the thermal cut off switch.  The part number for the Thermostat for a Kenmore 90 series 110 model dryer such as i have is 3390291 and the thermal cut off switch's part number is 3398671.
 
 remember to place wire jumpers back into their appropriate positions before installing the element with the new sensors in place back into the dryer.  Notice the free terminal on the coil terminal block and the cut off switch.  This is where the two wires inside the dryer connect to.
 make sure the element housing lines up with and installs into the circular cutout it was removed from in the rear of the dryer


 reinstall housing screws
reinstall element cover

 After hot wires are back into place, turn breaker back on and test dryer to ensure the element will heat up. Viola! back in business.  All for about $16.00 and $6.95 of that was shipping.


Slip front cabinet panel cover back onto the little black retainers and snap upper portion into place. You do not need any tools to do this part.

Please note:  sometimes the reason your 'thermal overload' fuse was opened (blown) in the first place may be directly linked to decreased exhaust flow resulting in a back-up of excess heat inside the dryer housing. (see here for further regarding cleaning out and replacing your air duct) 

It takes a lot of work to compose and write this blog for individuals to use for their gain when dealing with issues such as this, so if you would like, please feel free to donate.



Thanks, Chris
Ask Chris a question

What if you just replaced a sensor a week or two ago and now they are blown or gone faulty again?  

66 comments:

  1. OMG THANK YOU SO MUCH! I had the same issue with my dryer and your article allowed me to save money and perform this fix myself. I'm really grateful for the information on the wiring because I had completely forgot where the wires went after I had it all pulled out. Thank you!!!

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    1. you are welcome, glad it helped

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  2. Excellent instructions sir!!!! BIG HELP!!!

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  3. This information was a huge help. My dryer has been having issues on and off for a few months now and with this info we're able to get a new thermal cutoff switch and hopefully by tomorrow my fiancée will have my dryer back up and running so I can finish our laundry! Thank you

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    1. Glad it helped you out Beth, take care. Chris

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  4. I cannot tell you how good I feel about myself right now!! This information gave me the tools I needed to fix my own dryer! 8-yrs divorced - single mom. AMAZING feeling to be able to do this. Thank you so much!! I was able to test, root cause and replace the heating element. $13 ohm meter + $40 part. HUGE boost to self-confidence.
    many thanks!
    Jennifer K.
    Overland Park, KS

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  5. Thank you for your detailed review. Our family was worried that we would have to end up replacing the dryer and the washer as a result of the dryer stopping up. I am anything but a handy person and the simple instructions allowed me to definitely determine that our heating element was bad. Easily ordered for a grand total of $30 at Amazon along with new thermostat and switch for good measure! We are extremely tight on money and I cannot tell you how much good your review has done us; the thought of cutting our food budget any more in order to get a new dryer would have killed us off! God bless.

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    1. I am so glad that it helped you guys out, thanks so much for emailing me to inform me of the usefulness of my labors.

      Take care, Chris

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  6. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  7. Hi Chris,

    Thank you so-so much for your DIY article on replacement of the thermostat and thermal cutoff switches/fuses in a Kenmore series 90, Model 110 dryer. It was a clear and concise, ultra-detailed and extremely helpful article.

    We've used the information you shared in that article now on several occasions to repair our dryer, but we continue to have problems so I thought I'd write in hopes of getting your opinion on something. We've replaced the thermostat and thermal cutoff switches a total of 4-5 times in just the past few months, and the heater will begin working again, but within a matter of a few short days or weeks, the heating element will quit on us again, and each time, its the thermal cutoff switch that fails. I replaced the thermostat and thermal cutoff just two-weeks ago as a kit (meaning I replaced them both at the same time so that they would be pair-matched), and I double-checked them both with a multimeter before installation to make sure that they were both functional (i.e., that they each had continuity or a closed circuit across their respective terminals with slight readings of 0.0-0.2 ohms). I also made absolutely certain that the wires were all re-connected in the correct orientation and that the exhaust vent to the outside of the garage was completely unobstructed.

    Then, when I had completed all of those steps, it fired right-up on each occasion, ran perfectly fine, with normal to moderate levels of heat as expected (i.e., it wasn't too hot or anything), and it hummed along that way perfectly fine for 15-20 consecutive loads of clothes without incident (lasting 2-3 weeks typically), and then suddenly, yesterday, I went out into the garage and without warning, it had quit heating yet again (i.e., a load of wet towels that had been tumbling for 30-minutes remained cold and wet). So I let the dryer sit overnight, and it remains non-functional (no heat) again this morning. In other words, just like every other time in the past few months, the clothes bin inside rotates or tumbles as it should, but there is no heat, and each time I remove the heater element housing, I find that once again, the thermal cutoff switch is the culprit (i.e., the thermostat will read just fine (closed circuit at 0.0-0.1 ohms), and the heater element reads just fine (10-12 ohms). but I'll get an 'infinite' or open circuit reading on the multimeter for the thermal cutoff).

    So, I thought I'd write to you and ask . . . I don't fundamentally understand the functional difference between a thermostat and a thermal cutoff switch in such a circuit (i.e., they both would seem to have the very same function?), but given the fact that this is the 4th or 5th straight thermal cutoff switch that has failed on us, and given the fact that the wires are all connected properly and that there's no obstruction in the exhaust vent, is there ANY other electrical component that could be faulty in this situation? For example, is there a voltage regulator or something that could be allowing too much voltage to pass through to the thermostat and/or thermal cutoff switch? I just don't know what to do next?

    Thanks for your assistance.
    Joe

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  8. 1)check your exhaust duct thoroughly, too much lint buildup will definitely create extra heat buildup inside the cabinet creating the condition you are experiencing as well. Make sure to check the vent cap and make sure that the valve closure is not locked in the closed position thereby preventing breathing of the exhaust.

    2) the cold garage ambient air temperature may have something to do with the sensors faulting, "they are sitting inside a cold environment and within a few minutes are experiencing a significant temp change" The newer sensors may just have extremely thin contact strips and such that simply respond differently to this quick 'significant' temp change

    3)your fan may have gone bad and is simply not drawing the air out of the dryer tub and through the duct work, thus allowing hotter internal duct temps, and kicking the temperature sensors open

    chris

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  9. Thanks for the DIY article. Very clear instructions.
    Here is $5 for your time.
    Cliff

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    1. Thanks Cliff, received your donation...purchased me some garden seeds with those monies..lol

      Thanks a million, Chris

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  10. Hey Chris. Excellent article. Well documented with the right photos in the right place. Even better, was your choice of words to get the message across clearly with accurate descriptions of critical key facts about wire placement and bypassing the high limit cut off switch to temporarily verify diagnosis of it's failure. my 90 series MOD. 110. 96592200-65922. SER# MD1602213 KENMORE Extra capacity dryer just started not heating on all temp settings. I cheated the temp control knob with an ohmeter in all positions. I got OL on all positions. I also got 125 volts to the top wire and .3 volts to the bottom wire in all temp settings. I took the switch apart and found that one of the terminals had broken free of the reohstat. I tried to solder it back but the pc board would not allow the solder to flow. It just beaded up.
    Then I stumbled upon your site. Using your technique,I was able to determine that I also have a high temp limiter fuse that tested OL as well. Ad that to the parts list. I just wonder if my thermostat coupled with about 30% blockage in the exhaust ductwork is letting my heating element get the temperature too high? I have cleaned all the lint and blockage from the fan to the exit duct on the outside wall. There is a straight shot about 16 inches long from dryer vent to exit duct.
    We have noticed the dryer running a little hot lately, now this problem. It has worked flawlessly for 15 years or more. I'm thinking about changing the thermostat as well. When I had it off to check continuity, it rattled with a light shake. I was thinking it is letting the heating element get too hot and blew the high temp limiter fuse. Can you tell me if I'm on the right track? Or is there something I'm missing? Thanks

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    1. Thanks for the accolades, I do appreciate your feedback and comment.

      It sounds like you are on the right track. Say you,"shook the thermostat heard a slight rattle", your thermostat could have weak spring internally that is preventing the proper opening of the contacts when sensor is satisfied, thus allowing it to heat beyond the factory setting. I would say if it has been undergoing cycles for over 15+ years, that could very well be the issue being your dryer exhaust duct has been cleaned out thoroughly..

      and yes, clogged duct work will without a doubt create higher heating cycles, prevents proper breathing and eventually kicks the high limit thermal cutoff fuse

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  11. when you unplug the 2 wires off the heating element. they can plug back in on either terminal,, correct?

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    1. Yes, it does not matter. however, oft times one terminal is slightly larger than the other which might prevent you from doing so with the slightly different size stakons or female spade terminals. But if not...yes, you can plug them back on 'either terminal'

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  12. I have replaced the safety switch twice. First time it ran one cycle and second time it worked for about 2 weeks. How can I troubleshoot what might be causing the switch to blow?

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    1. check exhaust air flow, vaccuum out duct output at rear of dryer and ensure your entire exhaust ductwork to the exterior of your dwelling is clear, allowing the dryer to breathe freely. Clogged filtration and duct will create heat backup thereby popping thermal overloads. Also check your moisture heat sensors in the dryer's filter housing section, wipe them clean with some isopropyl alcohol, denatured alcohol or dielectric electrical contact spray with cotton cloth.

      Delete
  13. HEY CHRIS,
    Where does the yellow wire plug into. Came unplugged somehow .

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    1. Phillip would you mind emailing me via the contact form provided here on the blog at Contact Chris. This way I would have your email address and be able to respond accordingly. I do not have your email address provided when posting to article.

      Provide more details in regards to what wire you are making reference to, its location.

      Thanks, Chris

      Delete
  14. This is really a good walk through of how to fix the heater. Both fuses on mine had blown, but the element was fine.

    Two comments:

    (1) when replacing the heating assembly, there is a metal tab on the assembly ... This gets tucked *inside* the circular cutout at the rear of the dryer.

    (2) it helps to label all the wires before disconnecting them at the outset

    Great step by step info!!

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    1. Peter, yes in response to (1): yes that tab does indeed fit up into a little pocket at the back of the dryer, located at about 12 o'clock, above the exhaust hole

      (2) Yes that would help, sorry I didn't mention it. I simply failed to suggest that aspect, simply did not think about it. Having worked as a electrician in the past for several years consolidated with working on parts, machinery, equipment all of my life in various capacities, I guess I took for granted that everyone cannot simply recall the wires locations. I think most of that is simply due to the fact, the few wires just 'startle' them a little and we might over complicate matters therefore confusing the wires later on....

      Just because its something new...Like my Physics courses in college, OH MY GOD!!!!! so, so, so got my mind bent around the axle so tight, I would forget what step to execute next...crazy.

      but yes, I guess I should suggest that, thanks, Chris

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  15. kenmore model110.62972100 stops running after the push to start button is released

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    1. have you checked the continuity across the contacts of the switch with the continuity beep of a volt/amp meter or you could just use an ohm meter and if you get close to a zero reading than your continuity is good. Next, if there is nothing wrong with the switch you could have lost the ground loop or either one of the hot legs of the 240 volts either at your outlet behind the dryer or at the double pole circuit breaker.

      Not uncommon after some age for some contacts to burn 'open' and therefore you lose one of your hots. Also, do not neglect junction boxes underneath the residence or in the attic that could have an open joint.

      chris

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    2. if your ohm reading is close to zero, (this signifies that your switch is good within)

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  16. Chris,

    Thank you so very much. You instruction were so easy to follow. I just ordered a new safety switch. I'll have my drier repaired for $20. How many people throw a drier away for lack of a $20 part.

    Wranglerstar

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    1. Wrangler, yeah brother you are welcome. I appreciate your expressed appreciation, its good to know that others are benefiting. There are reasons the big wigs do not offer schematic breakdowns along with their equipment, they apparently would rather us trash and "buy new". This is just one small way that I am able to help people keep the money that they work so hard for. -chris

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  17. Chris,
    Great work but in my case, didn't go far enough. I have the same problem (motor runs but no heat) but the thermostats and heating element mentioned in your instructions checked out fine. My dryer has two more thermostats and a fuse located on the top of the blower unit just to the left of the heating element. I tested them with an ohm meter and found extremely high resistance (7K) across the inner leads on a 4-pin thermostat. Shouldn't that read ~0 ohms?
    Thanks for your assistance. This was the best explanation for debugging this problem I've come across on the 'net.

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    1. Dan, not quite sure about this, sounds like you are reading across a coil located inside that component you are mentioning, that might be some form of relay. But then again, there could potentially be resistors within which would account for such a higher ohm reading. Wish I could help you out but I'm just not familiar with such a setup as you have. Chris

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  18. I have the same problem as Napleton September 25, Stops running after Start button is release, Both legs are hot as far as I could trace into machine, If I hold the Start button in it will run until it trips some breaker in machine & burnt smell.

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    1. sounds like you have a short inside the motor perhaps thus the reason for the burnt smell or either a relay inside the control panel going bad

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  19. THANK YOU for your clear detailed instructions. I think that we have found the problem and hopefully the piece that I bought today will work and I can get back to doing laundry!!
    Thank you so much!!!

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    1. Thanks so much for your appreciation. I'm glad you found it helpful.

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  20. Big help in trouble shooting my dryer, thank you very much.

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  21. Chris,

    What would i need to do if the tub isnt turning anymore. Motor still running, dryer is still heating. The tub doesnt turn though.

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  22. I just replace my heating element in my Kenmore dryer after it was not heating. It still has no heat. I am beyond frustrated. All fuses have continuity. What else could it be?

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    1. do you have 240 volts line to line at your electrical outlet behind the dryer, make certain first off that you have not lost one of your 120 volt legs from an open connection perhaps in a junction box in crawlspace or in attic

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  23. You are a GOD send, I am that Girl, however surprised myself this time...and saved over 135.00 dollars. ordered the part off of Amazon for a total of 21 dollars and some change, local supplier wanted 56.00 just for the part plus installation. Well thanks to you I Gotter Done,,.,.....Keep helping people and you will continue to be blessed, as you were a blessing to me.

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    1. Thanks for the accolades. Looking for my bless-ed ship to come in

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  24. Great page. Hlped me easily diagnoe the issue with the Thermal cut-off switch and replace for cheap money.

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  25. Agree with all the previous comments...great page, easy to follow...bravo to you for helping people out this way!

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  26. Thank you so much, Chris! Your instructions helped me replace the fuse easily...and save a ton of money! Total cost to me was less than $10 for the parts via ebay plus a donation to you for your information. Keep up the great work, brother!

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    1. Thank you very much, glad it helped you and thanks a million for your thoughtfulness regarding the donation

      Delete
  27. I read where the wire burning off at the terminal to the element can be from the terminal itself. What is the rating and where do you get them. Do you crimp them just like any other terminal.

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    1. Yeah, there could have been a slight bend in the wire right at the crimp or the terminal may not have been crimped good the first time. Over the years, current draw and expansion and contraction of both copper wire and terminal composition, caused it to work lose enough that the continuity was hindered, thus creating the burnt out, exploded end.

      Yes, I just crimp new ones own using Stakon pliers. any good quality crimp that are sold for electrical connections will suffice.

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  28. Hi Chris. I have a Kenmore dryer model 110-72602101. I have the same problem. Dryer runs, no heat. The picture of the front panel on your dryer looks identical to mine except mine doesn't say 90 series. Will I be able to pretty much follow your instructions to try to trouble shoot my dryer? I'm desperate to get mine fixed. I'm the mother of 11 month old twin boys and we have alot of laundry, always. Your help is much appreciated.
    Sarah

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    1. Yes you should Sarah, the internal components on most of the model 110s should be very similar. The overall troubleshoot and dismantle should be even if the exact part numbers are different. -chris

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  29. Thanks a lot for the step-by-step. It wasn't identical to my model, but it was close enough. Very clear and concise, I learned everything I needed to know in about 5mins and knocked it out.

    Much appreciated sir!

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    1. You are very much welcome.

      If you are gleaning from the work, don't forget to share some love and donate to the cause. See donate button above. just saying

      Delete
  30. Hi,
    We have a Kenmore 110.646122000. It had been working OK, but then it would run for about 10 minutes then stop. No tumbling, no heating, nothing. Now it won't run at all and I'm not sure where to start. I tried holding down the starter button and nothing happens. I'm not sure how to access the wires that go to the door cutoff switch. Any thoughts? I've read the other comments and hope that we can draw on your expertise.
    Thanks for making a good page that many can benefit from!

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  31. If after replacing the safety sensor it fails again within a week what would you recommend? Write it off as a bad part and try again?

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  32. I have had like issue myself. I think that those sensors are 'all' just made cheaply. Apparently the probabilities of getting one that slipped through quality control measures is somewhat high because I have replaced a couple that did likewise but after replacement a second time, I have not had issues in years.

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  33. Thanks for the detailed steps!

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  34. Hello, as shown in your 5th picture from the top (with the yellow arrow), my heating element housing is making a loud rattle/vibration. Heating element works just fine. I can make the rattle/loud vibrating stop if I push in a bit on the flimsy metal housing piece shown with the yellow arrow in picture #5, but the rattle resumes 5 minutes later. Any ideas/directions that you can share? :) Thanks in advance! :) Kindest regards, JCI

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    1. It sounds like you just need to replace the installation screw of holding that shield in place with a larger sheet metal screw. The hole is probably just elongated and a little too large for the present screw.

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  35. Great write up. Gave me the confidence to undertake the diagnosis and repair myself. Dryer is producing heat again! I have made a small donation. Thanks.

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  36. Hi Chris. Today I went to dry a load of clothes and when I came back to check them after 20 minutes I noticed the timer had not progressed. The fuse at the breaker was tripped off. I reset the fuse and then started the dryer again. It proceeded to heat up to the point that the cabinet was almost too hot to touch and then blew the breaker again. It did this on all heat settings except air dry. Outside vent has air blowing out at same intensity as normal and is unblocked. Any ideas as to cause?? Thanks for your time.

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  37. Sounds like your dryer duct work is partially clogged and not breathing properly. I know, you say, you have good air flow but trust me if you have not changed it out in years...it is FULL of lint. Plus, sounds like you might could have a relay or wire that is shorting to ground, thus tripping the breaker. Would take some electrical troubleshooting.

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    1. Oh, and I should mention....my dryer sits about 18 inches from the exterior of the building and the duct from back of dryer to outside is only 2 ft long.

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  38. I just bought the set last fall from a used appliance store and then about 8 weeks ago moved and had it cleaned and reinstalled at my new residence. Is there interior duct work that could be cleaned? I took off the flex pipe at the back and ran it ten minutes ago and the air blows hard....

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    1. Yes, you should be able to just look up inside the interior pipe of the dryer once you have that flexible pipe removed and could vacuum out accordingly.

      I've reread your original posting. It seems like your thermostat located on either the dryer heating element housing or the moisture temp sensor located near the filter housing underneath the door have been tampered with by the prior owner and possibly 'bypassed'. You say you purchased the set used. Perhaps the past owner had issues with the dryer not running because one of the before-mentioned had blown.

      Well, so they just decided to bypass the sensor to have the dryer run again. Because one or both of those sensors are safety sensors and should open the circuit, thus killing power to your heating element. This should occur and not trip your circuit breaker in your electrical panel. The fact that you can flip your 'tripped' electrical circuit breaker back on and the dryer heat up again is telling me those sensors are defective or have been tampered with or bypassed.

      NOW, It seems like the original issue was the thermostat was stuck. I believe the pickup for this is the metallic strip inside the dryer drum that is near the door, close to the exhaust air grille. Follow those wires serving that to the thermostat itself and ohm out with a volt-amp-ohm meter to ensure you have appropriate continuity.

      I cannot advise really beyond this point without troubleshooting your particular dryer model with an electrical meter..

      Please reread this post here, it might help you locate those before-mentioned sensors.

      Also, read the 'Please READ!' tab at the top of the page

      Thank you, Chris

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  39. Thanks so much for the detailed information. And for directing me to Appliancezone.com. I ordered the part frome them for $7.50. The same part on the Sears website was around $33.00! And your pictures and instructions walked me right through everything. Many, many thanks!

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    1. Glad you were able to get your dryer running again. You are welcome.

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